The Importance of World Book Day

As I was scrolling through Twitter, I saw a tweet from RNIB about #WorldBookDay. According to worldbookday.com, World Book Day is a campaign with the goal of making sure every child and teen has a book of their own. Many schools, libraries and book shops will have a variety of activities for children and teens to enjoy.

I personally feel that this day is important because growing up with a visual impairment, my access to books was very limited. It was hard for me to find books in large print for me to read for pleasure. Once I was registered as a student with a visual impairment my wealth of knowledge was only expanded to my school books. As a teenager I still found myself looking at books in large print for younger children when I went to the bookshops. This was because the price of audio books was too pricy for my mother to pay.

I believe that every child, no matter if they are fully sighted or if they have a visual impairment, should have a chance to read. To help achieve this goal you can go and volunteer at your local library. Reading to a child can help them fall in love with reading, help strengthen their vocabulary, spelling and with reading comprehension.  Depending on where you live some libraries and bookshops can take donated books and either sell them at half price or give them away for free.

If you live in England and your child or teenager has a visual impairment be sure to stop by RNIB’s World Book Day 2019 page to see the 14 new titles that are available in an audio Daisy CD or in Braille which can be ordered for free. You can also get these books in large print.

If you live in the United States and have a child that has a qualified reading disability remember that www.bookshare.org, offers free memberships for students from pre-school all the way through college. Volunteers can donate their time in several ways, and in return they can earn credits that can be used to purchase a years’ worth of membership for members of Bookshare.

Together we can make books accessible. 😊

#How I See (RNIB’s Campaign)

Hi Blog world,

Last week, on one of the Nystagmus Support groups that I am a member of,  posted YouTube’s Glen’s (Well_eye_never) #How I see campaign YouTube video. This campaign is ran through RNIB.  I really liked Glen’s video and the campaign, and once I saw more people tweeting their #How I See campaign on Twitter, I thought it was time to join in.

When people look at me they don’t realize that I have a visual impairment from Nystagmus. Once people find out that I am visually impaired I explain to them that my vision is like looking through a clear piece of Saran Wrap. For me my vision is best during the morning, and as the day goes on, and the more tired my eyes get the blurrier my vision becomes.

I also have night blindness which makes getting around in low light, during dusk or during the night more difficult. I use a cane when I need it, and it makes getting around easier.

Even though I have these vision problems that doesn’t mean I have to stop doing everyday tasks. I have low vision aids such as a dome magnifier to help me access small print.  I have a talking book player and access to talking books from my local library, as well as, Bookshare.org so I can enjoy audio books of all different  Genres.

As far as, using the computer I use a screen reader called, ZoomText. I like this program because it can speak what’s on the screen to me, and I can also change the color of the screen to make things easier to read. It has different ways of tracking the mouse pointer too, which helps me when my eyes are tired.  I have a speech to text reading and writing program called Kurzweil 3000-this program allows me to read books, and write and edit documents such as my blog. 🙂 It has many different features that makes using the program easy to use-such as, changing the background color, the tracker, and changing the speed at which text is read to me.

All in all, I can say the most important thing I use on a daily basis is my Apple Iphone. I can now text with ease because of the built-in microphone and voice reader. I can also use the magnifier instead of using my dome magnifier.

Lastly, the most important tool I have is great and supportive family and friends, no matter if its face to face or online, they remind me that I am a stronger person despite my disability, and to keep positive no matter what I face as a person with a visual impairment.

To learn more about RNIB  and their #How I See campaign visit their website at: http://www.rnib.org.uk/

To see Glen’s #How I see Campaign video visit his blog at: How I See (RNIB #HowISee Campaign)

Please note, none of these websites have sponsored my post, but please feel free to check out their links.

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blog soon,

Amanda Gene