2019: October is Dyslexia Awareness Month

Dyslexia was a word that I didn’t understand much as a child. As a second-grade student I went once a day to sound out letters, write letters and to practice reading. I didn’t understand why I was sent to this classroom. All I knew was that I thought the class was boring. Day after day I would go through the flash cards with sounds A Apple, P Preacher. Finally, one day, I asked my mom why I was in the class. She explained to me that I had a condition that effected my learning. The condition was called Dyslexia.

According to the International Dyslexia Association, Dyslexia is a brain disorder that effects two main abilities, and that is to read and spell.

 

 

There are many myths that people generally hear about Dyslexia. I have decided to discuss three of them.

  1. People with Dyslexia can not read. This myth is false. I struggled to read, however with proper support and training I can read very well.
  2. People with Dyslexia see the words backwards. This is false as well. I may get my letters and sometimes numbers backwards, but I don’t see the words backwards.
  3. People with Dyslexia can not be successful. This is completely false. Many famous people have Dyslexia and are successful. I see myself as a successful person. With technology and hard work Dyslexia doesn’t have to control me. I can overcome it.

What are some myths that you have heard about Dyslexia? Let me know down in the comments below.

National Dyslexia Month…What It Means to Me

“Hey Alexa, spell the word Dyslexia,” I requested my Amazon Echo Alexa. “Sorry, I don’t know that one,” Alexa response. Once again, I request the spelling. D-Y-S-l-E-X-I-A… Dyslexia was the diagnosis I received when I was in the second grade. Back then my mother and teachers could not figure out why I was struggling to read and spell. Testing showed that I have a learning disability called Dyslexia.

According to the International Dyslexia Association, “Dyslexia is a specific learning disability that is neurobiological in origin. It is characterized by difficulties with accurate and/or fluent word recognition and by poor spelling and decoding abilities.”

What this means is people who have this learning disability have brains that function differently when it comes to learning these specific skills.

Because I was struggling with reading, writing and spelling I went through the Texas Scottish Rite Hospital Dyslexia Training Program while I was in elementary school. With the program’s help I was taught to decode words by using phonetics. This taught me how to read better. The class taught me how to write and spell and use resources like the dictionary when I got stuck with my spelling. With this new-found confidence my grades improved.

I have seen several documentaries about Dyslexia, and one thing I hear that makes me so sad, besides the normal myths and stereotypes, is how parents worry about their child’s future. Many people think that people with this disability cannot have a good career and they will struggle. I can tell you from my own personal experience that just because someone has Dyslexia does not mean they cannot have a good career. We may have to use assistive technology to help us cope, however that is okay. I have a great budding career. I love writing despite having this disability. I have a journalism degree and I want to run my own business.

This month is National Dyslexia month, and it means a lot to me because it helps educate the public about the disability and that people can have success.