Crossing the streets blindfolded (independent living skills series 11)

I was early for class, and I was glad I was because my classmates and I were able to connect on levels of being visually impaired, and the impact of having a disability. Soon we headed inside and we started class on time. We all had our assigned lessons and we went our separate ways. I had Orientation and Mobility. The lesson we had was reviewing how to cross streets, however to help us focus on our skills we were going to do it blindfolded.

Now before anyone freaks out, our teacher does this one student at a time and stays within our space and she will grab us if we make a wrong move. This will keep us from getting hurt.

I was going with another student who was nervous about our lesson, however I had confidence. Because of this fact I volunteered to go first. Once we got downtown, before I put my blindfold on, we chose our landmark. I put my blindfold on and my confidence left. I walked slowly because I was scared. My teacher told me I needed to walk with confidence, and to focus on what my cane felt. Soon I came to my first street crossing; I knew I had to use the sound of the traffic on my right side as a guide.

I heard the sound of the traffic and I took off, but then I hesitated. My teacher helped me get back onto the sidewalk and she said I had to walk with confidence. Once again, I used the traffic noise as a guide and I took off at the right time. I was panicked as I crossed the street, so much so that I missed feeling my cane hitting a curb. If it was not for my teacher being there I would have landed on my face. Because my crossing was so bad, she led me back across the street for a second time. This time I was calmer and I felt my cane hit the curb. Success.

We continued on our journey, and I learned how to move around objects. I also learned how to use the traffic as a guide to keep me moving in the right direction.

Soon I was able to take my blindfold off, and I was grateful.

It was my classmates turn, she did fine with her travel. One thing we talked about was being as independent as possible if we were to lose our site completely.

By this time, it was time for lunch. We went to a local hamburger joint. I volunteered to walk up to the restaurant blindfolded, and I had to re-learn how to open a door. I took my blindfold off during lunch. I had a milkshake, a basic burger and fries. Which is one of my favorite meals. 😊

After lunch, we went and dropped off my classmates at school, and my teacher and I went to the mall. I was still nervous about learning how to step on and off the escalators. However, I found out I had my cane too far out in front of me. Once I had it in the right position, I was able to get on and off with ease.

My confidence was so high that I called a friend, via video chat, and I had my teacher follow me with the phone. It was great to show off my new skill and confidence.

The Disabled Bloggers Tag

This Tag was first created by Elin otherwise known as MyBlurredWorld.

Click here to read Elin’s The disabled blogger Tag post

1, When and Why did you start your blog?
I was a Freshmen in college, and we had to set up and keep a blog for the semester. I liked the class because we were able to choose the content of our blogs.
2. Did you intend to talk about your disability online from the beginning?
Yes, because my eye condition is so rare, many people haven’t heard of it.
3. Have you ever been skeptical about talking about your disability online?
No, I haven’t been skeptical about talking about it. I was hoping that this would actually help educate the public on the conditions I have.
4. What kind of response have you/do you receive in terms of your disability related blog posts?
For me its been positive, and a lot of people have came forth to say “Thank You,” because they have one of my conditions themselves and they stated they no longer feel alone.
5. Do you write/Talk about other topics apart from disability?
I’m trying out different topics, and I love learning about what other interests my audience have besides disability related topics.
6. What steps do you take to make your blog accessible to yourself as well as other people?
I love using WordPress, and for me, this has been the easiest platform for me to blog on. I try to make the blog accessible to others by reminding myself of the color scheme and the size and style of font that I use.
7. What is your favorite thing about blogging about your disability?
The fact that I can use this platform to help educate the public about the myths and true facts that surround disability.
8. What are your top three favorite disability related blog posts that you’ve ever published?
My three favorites would be:
1.Call to action: Come help make a big splash for a big impact!

2. Nystagmus Tag (Nystagmus Awareness Day)
3. Jessica and Diesel: the freedom continues
9. Do you think that the disabled blogger/YouTube Community is overlook?
Not really, I think there are a lot of other bloggers and YouTubers that are making a difference to help stop the stigma around disability. However, we still have a long way to go when it comes to continuing to making the facts more positive rather than negative facts known.

10. Do you find it difficult to think of new disability related content to publish?
Sometimes I do. However, I have a lot of great role models out there who are providing great ideas.
11. Do you think that blogging about your disability helps change people’s perceptions?
I think I am, and I’m proud to help shine some positive light on what people with disabilities can do.
12. Who do you Tag?
I would like to Tag the following bloggers to complete the tag:
Well Eye Never (Glen)
Life’s Journey (Jessica)