Night Blindness

Hi Blog world,

I just wanted to drop a line about one of my vision problems: Night Blindness.  I was diagnosed with this eye problem last May.  For those of you that don’t know about Night Blindness, according to http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/003039.htm, “Night blindness is poor vision at night or in dim light.”

Because of my night blindness, I was told that I would have to use a white cane at night.  Night blindness can be very scary for me; there has been times when I have almost fallen, or have even ran into a glass door because I didn’t see it.  I sometimes feel sad too.

Because we caught this early there are things we can do to try to help my night blindness, such as making sure I take my vitamins and using my eye drops.  But the best defense against night blindness is to prevent it.

Blog  soon,

Amanda Gene

 

Dyslexia

Hi Blog world,

I just wanted to take a moment and talk about my second disability-Dyslexia.  For those that would like to know, according to http://www.medicinenet.com/dyslexia/article.htm “Dyslexia is a learning disability that affects a person’s ability to read and write, and spell.” I was diagnosed with Dyslexia went I was in second grade.  I don’t remember very much about my training other than we used to card to help use learn the sounds of letters.  Because of this early training, I was taught how to read, but not how to spell.

Spelling and misuse of words, has been my biggest struggle in school.  It takes me a long time for me to edit my work and still sometimes I still don’t get all of my wording or spelling right.  Click on this video link to see  an example of what it’s like to have this disability, and what it’s like for me to write some of my work: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbiD7VDz9oA

Many of my friends say that because I have Dyslexia, I have my own special language, which we joke-ling call “Amanda Language.” When you get to learn how to read my language, it mostly is easy to translate, even though sometime it can’t be translated back into Standard English.  It makes my very upset when I can’t get the word that I want down on paper, or that I have to use a low vocabulary to say what I want.  I know that I am very smart, and even though it takes me longer to work within my language problems I can write, and read, and even though I can’t always get my spelling right.

There is hope for those who have Dyslexia scientist and researchers are working around the clock to find ways to help us learn to deal with our disability, why our disability is occurring, and hopefully one day find a cure for it.

If anyone has any question please ask in the comments below,

Blog soon,

Amanda Gene

Amanda Gene: My story of what’s it’s like being visually impaired

Hi Blog world,

I really like this post because I can share my story of what it is like being visually impaired. I was born twenty-eight weeks early weighing one pound five ounces and I was only 12 inches long. Because of the fact, that I came into this world so small and sick, the doctors of the NICU gave me a five percent chance of making it. I survived!
Because of my birth, I have some problems, I am legally blind, I have mild cerebral palsy, and I have a learning disability that makes reading and spelling hard for me, this disability is called Dyslexia.
My eye condition is very rare, it’s called Congenital Nystagmus, which means that my Macular did not form all the way, and my eye’s muscle that controls my eyes cannot hold still, so therefore, my eyes continuously bounce around. When my eyes are moving I can feel it, and sometimes, when my eyes are tired it is painful.
My vision is like looking through a piece of clear wrapping paper; it’s very blurry and during the day I start to lose some of my vision that I have. I was recently diagnosed with night blindness and dry eye. Because of this fact, I have to use eye drops four times a day.
I was diagnosed with a vision problem when I was in the fifth grade. Since then, I have been in programs for people with low vision, and in these programs I have learned how to use the computer, by using a program called ZoomText, which tells me what is going on. I also learned how to use a reading program called Kurzweill 3000, which is how I access my textbooks, and other reading material.
I also learned how to cook, and manage a home; I have gained valuable job skills that will help me in my career one day.

Here is a link to a story that I wrote for the school’s newspaper last term, please check it out: Blind Achieve Independence

If anyone has any questions about any of my disabilities, please feel free to ask in the comments below.

Blog soon,

Amanda Gene

 

Introduction: Who is Amanda Gene?

Hi Blog world,

I would like to take this time to tell you a little about myself.  I am working towards my AA degree in Journalism at the local state college. This term will be a learning experience as I am taking Math Lib Arts 2, Elements of nutrition, Elements of Nutrition Lab, World Lit; and my favorite class New Media Tech.

When I am not in school, I usually spend some of my free time writing, reading, spending time with my family and friends. I also have a twelve-year of Boston terrier, ten-gallon fish tank, and a half-gallon Beta tank.

Blog soon,

Amanda Gene

 

Find Good Vibes

Grace Bailey // blog

Nyxie's Nook

Mental health & Wellness

nicholassteele98

Blindness Quotes God

BloggingTip GA

Free PLR Articles

Under My Umbrella!!

Why try to fit in, when you were born to stand out? Dr. Seuss!

arianadagan.wordpress.com/

artist + creative coach

Tales of a Professional Procrastinator

Why I eventually completed tomorrow's list

Miranda's Musings

I have vision. Do you?

Detelshia Monet

Experiencing life one day at a time.

The Martha Review

"If we want to explore deeper oceans, we first have to leave sight of the shore.”

Rev. Rebecca Writes

Faith. Books. Disability Awareness

Advicebyher

We are here to inform and inspire.

dolphin519

Insparational support thoughts on random topics and quotes

Damon Ashworth Psychology

Melbourne Clinical Psychologist

Write On Ejaleigh!

WRITING READING TEACHING LEARNING

Popping Wheelies

You've seen many of us Wheelies. Have you ever wondered what life is like when lived on wheels? You are about to find out.

VIBlindResources

Blindness resources

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: