Interview with Laurie (Guest Post #24)

Hi everyone, Today’s blog post comes from my friend and fellow blogger, Laurie. Be sure to check out her blog and follow her on social media.

  1. What is your name? Laurie
  2. Age? 55
  3. What is the name/cause of your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have)? Mental health issues such as chronic depression and anxiety. Invisible illnesses such as Celiac and autoimmune diseases such as microscopic colitis, also sleep apnea,chronic fatigue syndrome and osteoarthritis among many dx.
  4. How does your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have) effect you on a daily basis? It makes it difficult to function on some days between the fatigue and pain. Brain fog can make keeping up with my blog a struggle. I look at others blogs and have a really hard time not judging mine but I am not going to give up.
  5. What do other people feel about your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have)? Because it is not visible to them it is hard to know or remember that I have a chronic battle that I struggle with daily. It gets frustrating at times.
  6. If you had to give one piece of advice to others about having a visual impairment (or other disability that you may have) what would it be? Don’t live your life based on what you think others think of you. Make sure you take care of you no matter what. We need to break the stigmas and show them that we are more than our dx. We are people with feelings and can live a full happy life in spite of our disease or disability.
  7. Who has inspired you the most in life and your blogging and or YouTube channel? My youtube channel inspiration was due to watching my daughter with her having fun with her animal channels. My blog is something I have always wanted to do but struggled with the confidence to really go for it. Then Ruth Soukup started using the “Do It Scared” motto and it keeps me going.
  8. Besides writing or making YouTube videos, what do you like to do in your spare time? I love to read. I don’t have a specific genre of book. I like many types. I also like to watch movies with family we sometimes have family craft nights too.
  9. Name a bad habit that you have? Emotional eating
  10. Name your best quality?   Empathetic
  11. If you could interview anyone living or dead who would it be and why? That is a tough question. Maybe Mother Theresa. She did so much good and I want to know how she did it all.
  12. What is your college major/Minor? Bachelors arts liberal studies with minor in early childrens services and minor in psychology
  13. What school (college or university) did you go to? UMA~ University of Maine at Aug
  14. What is the title of your blog or YouTube channel? SEEKING SERENITY AND HARMONY
    Laurie photo
    Photo provided by Laurie.

     

     

     

    1. When and why did you start your blog or YouTube channel?
  15. BLOGhttps://seekingserenityandharmony.comI dabbled with a few random blogs off and on but didn’t really get into it until early 2018. My goal is to spread awareness about mental health and invisible illness issues and stigma. I also have a strong interest in advocacy for children as I am watching the mental health rates in our youth rise instead of decline in the last several years. Youth are also showing signs of mental health issues at much younger ages now than ever before.

    YOUTUBE CHANNEL

    It started out as just a place that I posted some bird videos of my poultry so I could share them on Backyard Chickens where I am a member. I have utilized it some during It’s a Lovely Life’s Blogging Challenges but don’t utilize it as much as I should. I want to do a lot more videos this year and hopefully some much better quality ones. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRDPiiXB_K0NemU4cHy42qg?view_as=subscriber

  16. Where do you see yourself in five years? In 5 years I hope that I will have more time to write and focus on the projects I want to spend time working on. I would like to think that in 5 years I will have improved my health issues and not have such a daily struggle.
    1. Where can other people find you on Social media (Please list and provide links)
  17. https://www.instagram.com/seekingserenity2001/https://twitter.com/harmony2001https://www.pinterest.com/SeekingSerenityandHarmony/

    https://www.facebook.com/seekingserenityandharmony/

    https://www.facebook.com/SeekingSerenityandHarmonyHomestead/

Interview with Ami (Guest Post #23)

Hi Everyone, today’s guest post is from Ami. Be sure to check out and follow her on social media. 🙂

What is your name (or blog/channel name)?

My name is Ami and my blog is UndercoverSuperhero!

Age?

I’m 25 in January.

What is the name/cause of your visual impairment (or other disabilities that you may have)?

I have Bilateral Hearing Loss, Optic Neuropathy, Severe Nerve Damage, Sensory Ataxia, Transverse Myelitis, Raynaud’s Disease, Depression, Anxiety, and I have recently been diagnosed with Mitochondrial Disease.

How does your visual impairment (or other disabilities that you may have) effect you on a daily basis?

I have hearing loss to a degree; I can hear some things but I struggle when others are speaking. Optic Neuropathy (Central Vision Loss) means that the tissue behind my eyes, are very pale which leads to the loss of my central vision. These two impairments combined leave me unable to watch TV, read small pieces of text. Plus, I cannot see some facial features unless they are very close in front of me.

Severe Nerve Damage was caused by an untreated Vitamin B12 Deficiency. Transverse Myelitis caused me to lose all of my mobility, due to my spinal cord becoming inflamed. This also causes me to experience altered sensations in my hands; they feel like I’m constantly wearing rubber gloves.

Sensory Ataxia affects my balance, co-ordination and fine motor skills. The sensory part causes me to not be able to sense where my limbs are, unless I’m actually looking at them (with my good side vision). I can walk a few metres with my walking frame, but due to Sensory Ataxia causing muscle weakness, I become tired very quickly.

Raynaud’s Disease is where my hands, feet, and ears are oversensitive to cold temperatures, thus causing an attack where the blood vessels in my extremities (fingers and toes) become narrow and decrease the amount of blood flow. The attack causes sharp pains, very cold hands and feet. I sometimes have to wear gloves and ear cuffs in the summer!

My recent diagnosis of Mitochondrial Disease came after a muscle biopsy discovered a mutation on one of my genes’. I’m still learning about this disease, but so far, this is possibly the cause of my Sensory Ataxia, Optic Neuropathy and Bilateral Hearing Loss – it’s difficult to say how Mitochondrial affects me symptom-wise as, for me, it’s most likely the cause of 3, possibly 4, of my disabilities and impairments.

I’ve had Depression and Anxiety for just over a decade, it’s definitely improved over the years and despite all my disabilities, I am generally a happy person and try to remain positive. However, due to flashbacks and certain life events, I can experience bad bouts with my Mental Health.

Ami

What do other people feel about your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have)?

I’ve never been asked this before! I think at the beginning, of my symptoms, my family didn’t really understand what was happening, which to be fair, nor did I. However, as I slowly learned to adapt, they started to adapt to my disabilities and impairments too. As soon as they realised that, deep down, I’m still the same Ami, they didn’t treat me any different and we could move forward.

If you had to give one piece of advice to others about having a visual impairment (or other disability that you may have) What would that be?

My advice would be – I know it seems scary right now, that’s normal, but as you learn to adapt to your disability or impairment, you will learn that the world around you can be adapted too. Just take one day at a time.

Who has inspired you the most in life?

Growing up, I never felt I had anyone to look up to. However, that changed when I fell in love with superhero movies. Superheroes have their own issues to contend with, but they push them aside when they save the world. They don’t let anything hold them back.

Who has inspired you for your blog or YouTube channel?

Sam Cleasby, a radio presenter and activist who blogs about life with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Ulcerative Colitis, inspired me to share my recovery story through writing and I’ve not looked back since.

Besides writing or making YouTube videos what do you like to do in your spare time?

Besides writing, I love volunteering! I volunteer as one of Scope’s Online Community Champions, the role includes welcoming new members, signposting members to relevant resources which may be of use to them. Try to answer any unanswered posts, flagging up posts which suggests the member is putting themselves or others at risk. Reporting any spam and generally keeping the community a safe and supportive place for everyone.

I’m also the Leader of Ataxia UK – Norfolk Branch Online Support Group on Facebook, it is quite a quiet group but I’m always on hand if anybody has any questions or needs any support.

Name a bad habit that you have?

Not writing something down while I remember it! Otherwise, its forgotten.

Name your best quality?

Strong – not physically! But strong within, I have had a tough few years but it’s made me a better person and I wouldn’t change a thing.

If you could interview anyone living or dead who would it be and why?

Tom Hiddleston because he is incredibly passionate about each role he portrays; I’d love to find out what inspired him to become an actor. Also, I love his dedication to charity work. He is handsome too!

What is your college major/minor?

I didn’t attend college.

Why did you choose the title of your blog or YouTube Channel?

I love superheroes and as cliché as it sounds, UndercoverSuperhero just popped in my head when I woke up one morning.

When and why did you start your blog or YouTube channel?

After writing my first guest post, for Scope, it inspired me to write about my recovery journey. UndercoverSuperhero began in October 2018.

Where do you see yourself in five years?

I would love to become a Wedding Planner within the next 5 years! Regarding my blog, I’m enjoying watching it evolve; I like to be spontaneous with it. In general, I hope to still be taking each day as it comes and making the most of my life.

Where can other people find you on social media? (Please list and provide the links.)

My blog – UndercoverSuperhero – https://undercoversuperhero.com

Facebook Page – https://www.facebook.com/UndercoverSuperheroAmi/

Twitter – https://twitter.com/AmiHIreland

Instagram – https://www.instagram.com/undercover_superhero_ami/

YouTube – https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC0zcvNOK_xw56IZ-Ab790kA

Pinterest – https://www.pinterest.co.uk/USuperheroAmi/

 

How my eating disorder fed off my Body Dysmorphic Disorder (BDD) (part 1).

As I reluctantly looked in the mirror in my college bathroom,  I would glance at the toilet and back to the mirror, then back to the toilet, and then back to the mirror, as I pulled my long  blonde hair back into a ponytail.  Hurry up! Stick your fingers in your mouth! You’re fat! You binged again… If you would just throw up and lose a pound or two you would be prettier, and you would feel better! These were the thoughts that often went through my mind when I faced the mirror. I was depressed, lonely, and was downright unhappy. The truth was I was binge eating my feelings.

When I ate in the cafeteria, I mainly only ate cheeseburgers and French fries, then would go back for plate after plate of French fries – – and would wash it all down with Dr. Pepper!  Beyond that, I also stored snacks in my dorm room, such as chocolate pudding, pop tarts, ice cream, popcorn and cans of Ravioli. Consequently, the items from this menu only added more pounds and not only worsened my BDD, but also increased my desire to sometimes purge.

At that time, I remember trying on my favorite pair of jeans and could barely zip them up.  I thought to myself either the washer or the dryer at my school has made my jeans shrink, or I have gained weight. Either way, I need new clothes. When I visited my grandparents the following weekend, my grandpa commented that I had put on a few pounds. That’s when I realized that the college’s washer or dryer were not to blame.

Later that day, my grandma offered to take me to Walmart to buy me some new jeans. Because I was a poor college student, I was thankful for this gift.

When we arrived at Walmart, and were looking at some jeans, a female sales associate approached us and asked if she could help.

My grandma then said to the sales associate, “When she was at Pensacola State College she didn’t gain weight, and now that she is at The University of West Florida she has put on weight and we don’t know what size to get her.”  As I stood there listening to those words, I felt ashamed of my body. Looking back at this memory I realized that comments from my grandmother, friends and other family members attributed my eating disorder and BDD. As I stood there feeling hot from embarrassment, the female associate turned to a male co-worker who was standing nearby stocking shelves, “Just ignore this.”  Then she eyed me up and turned to my grandma and said, “She does have a nice figure despite her gaining the freshmen 15. I would try the next size up from her current jeans.” I fought back tears as my BDD turned the freshmen 15 into the freshmen 100 in my mind.

After I tried on a few pairs, and as I stood l there not wanting to look at myself in the mirror because of my BDD, I knew in my heart that if I didn’t get a hold of this problem it would continue to spiral out of control.

Disclaimer: If you are having problems with either your physical or mental health please seek professional medical care.

Three tips to help improve handwriting

March is Cerebral Palsy awareness month. I have seen parents on many social media platforms raise concern about how Cerebral Palsy can affect their children’s handwriting. To help raise awareness, here is three tips to help improve your little one’s handwriting:

  1. Pick a teaching curriculum that is easy to follow and easy to teach. When I was going through Physical and Occupational Therapy, I was taught two different methods of handwriting. One was taught through the school system and one was taught at the local military base where I lived in Texas at the time. Because I was already used to the one from the school system, the other method I learned at the military base confused me. As a result, I ended up using the HandWriting WithOut Tears method from my Occupational Therapist at my local school. That method was easy for me to learn.

2. Strengthening hand muscles! I loved this activity when I was a child. Because having strong muscles is a key in improving handwriting, they used this play activity to help improve my muscle strength in my hands. I had to do other activities such as stretching a rubber band and playing with jumping plastic frogs. I found that these activities were some of my favorites.  Even though my Physical and Occupational Therapy stopped when I was around 14, They told to continue to keep my hand muscles tight by working with either TherapyPuddy Or Playdoh 😊

3. Stay positive and practice. This is the most important piece of advice that I can give. When I entered the sixth grade, my Occupational Therapist and my mother decided to stop teaching me to write in cursive. Their reason was because my handwriting did not improve like they hoped. I was only taught, in cursive, how to write my signature.

My printing is much better than cursive.  After that year, I worked on Typing. I have found reports stating that the Therapist was doubtful that I would ever be a good typist. During my senior year of high school, I started having problems taking notes. I experienced hand cramps and a lot of pain. To combat this, they gave a small keyboard to take notes. This enabled me to type the notes I needed.  At my last typing test, I typed 97 words per minute. Not too bad for someone who was told that they would never be able to type. As far as the cursive goes, I pushed myself with that too. With the help of my low vision teacher, and a positive attitude, I was able to learn all my letter and my handwriting has improved. Don’t give up on your child. Keep positive and you will see some amazing results.

Nothing in this post is sponsored in any way. This post is based off my own childhood memories and experiences. If you are concerned about your child’s handwriting or health, please speak with the proper medical professionals.

A follower Asked….

A Facebook friend and follower who has Nystagmus, asked me to offer some tips on how to manage Nystagmus while you are sick.

As always, I advise this friend and all my followers that If you are having any kind of medical or mental problems, please seek proper medical care.

Even though I am not a medical professional, and I am not offering any medical advice, I want to offer five tips that has helped me feel better when I have been sick. I hope that these tips answer this follower’s question.

  1. Admit that you are sick and that you need to rest.

We all lead busy lives and sometimes we just carry on with what we are doing. When you have a sever sickness, you need to admit that you are sick stay home. I had to convince myself of this during my high school days. I used to go into school just to take one test then go to the office to go and get checked out. This did not help me or school community.

  1. Drink plenty of fluids.

When I was a young child, I loved chicken broth and Sprite. This helped me with any sore throat that I may of had.

  1. Get some sleep! Sleep is so important with your health. Not only is it important when you’re sick, but also when you are well. When I am sick, I can feel my Nystagmus go even faster. My eyes hurt a lot more than normal. Therefore, when we take an extra nap, it really reduces our eye movements and sooth our achy eyes.
  2. Go to the doctor when needed.

This was an important lesson I had to learn as a teenager. When I was seventeen, I had a kidney infection. For one month before my diagnosis, I kept saying to myself, “You’re not sick, you just threw your back out during P.E.” That was a big lie. The pain made me cry and sent me to the Emergency Room. As a result, I received two bags of fluids to decrease my heartrate and blood pressure. I had to stay overnight. If I had gone to my general practitioner earlier I would not have had to go through all that.

  1. Don’t let stress make your immune system weak after you have made a full recovery.

People with Nystagmus know stress can increase their eye movements.  I missed three days school due to my kidney infection. As a result, I fell behind with my school work. This stressed me out! My stress increased even further when I learned that school policy only allowed me three days to get back on track with my work. I should have paced myself. I felt rushed because of this deadline, and increased my anxiety and stress levels which made me feel weaker after my recovery.

I am sure that there are many more tips that I could have offered. If you can think of something, that you would like to add tell me in the comments below.

Disclaimer: If you are experiencing any problems with your physical or mental health please seek proper medical care.

If you have a question you would like to ask me feel free to email me at: amanda@amandagene.com

Interview with Matt Harris (Guest Post #20) And a GIVEAWAY!

Matt is a good friend of mine. He writes amazing poetry. Be sure to enter the giveaway and follow Matt on social media. 🙂

Let’s start with the basics…

  1. What is your name? My name is Matt Harris, and I’m a fifty-nine-year-old poet—and author of Seeing Through Blindness. I live just outside of Baltimore, MD. Before we begin, I would like first to say hello to your readers and to thank you, Amanda, for giving me this opportunity to share a little bit about myself and my work.

 

  1. What is your college major/Minor? I am currently enrolled as an English Major, with a specialization in Creative Writing, at the University of Baltimore. Several years ago, my marriage broke up; and a year later, I was diagnosed with Usher Syndrome (US). US is a genetic disease that robs a person of both eyesight and hearing. At that time, as a former drug and alcohol abuser, who had been sober for 20 years, I feared that I might fall back into that lifestyle again, because I so desperately wanted to numb the pain from my marital breakup and Usher Syndrome diagnosis. The words Go buy a six-pack, one won’t hurt kept echoing through my mind. But I knew that was a lie. I knew from my past substance abuse that this old saying applied to me: one drink was too many and ten were not enough. So, I pushed those lies aside and decided to lean on my faith in Jesus. He has kept me sober and has given me the strength and comfort that I needed to cope with the pain. And shortly thereafter, I enrolled in the University of Baltimore at age 55, with a 99% vision loss and a 60% hearing loss. If everything goes as expected, I will be graduating in the spring of 2020. I plan to write a memoir based on this experience. I hope it will make a nice bookend to my poetic memoir, Seeing Through Blindness, which tells about my experiences with blindness and drugs as a teenager and young adult.

Let’s talk about writing/YouTube/Blogs…

  1. Who has inspired you the most in life and your blogging and or YouTube channel? My mother, who passed away last year, was a great inspiration for me. She grew up in Baltimore with 6 brothers and a sister. And although they lived in poverty, my mom chose to work hard and fight her way out of her circumstances. What inspired me initially about blogging, however, was that I wanted to try to get out information about my book—and to share its message of hope. I also wanted to blog about other poets’, or writers’, work as well. I think it’s important for writers to support one another, as you do, Amanda. But my blog turned into a rather eclectic assortment of topics—everything from an article about a blind man from Scripture named Bartimaeus to a friend whose rock band once opened for Led Zeppelin in Baltimore. But since starting college, I have largely neglected my blog because my studies have taken top priority. I hope to focus more on blogging after I graduate. As for YouTube, other than a few poetry recitations, I haven’t utilized my channel to its fullest potential. But after having watched some of your YouTube videos, Amanda, you have inspired me to take another look at how I could use my channel to help people and, at the same time, support other writers and promote my own work.
  2. Besides writing or making YouTube videos, what do you like to do in your spare time? I love to read. I’m a HUGE Stephan King fan, currently reading Doctor Sleep. I also love reading Scripture. In addition to reading, I like walking, going to the beach, attending plays, poetry readings, going to the movies, engaging in good conversations, and eating at restaurants. During football season, I love listening to Baltimore Ravens’ games. The team was named after one of my favorite poems: “The Raven,” by Edgar Allan Poe.
  3. What is the title of your blog or YouTube channel? My blog, along with information about my book, can be found at my website: seeingthroughblindness.com.
  4. Have you ever written a book? If so tell me about it? My latest book, as I mentioned earlier, is called Seeing Through Blindness. It tells about my battles with visual impairment, drugs, and God during my teenage years and young adult life. It speaks not only to the issues of people with disabilities but also to issues concerning addiction and marginalization in society. Since I’m a poet, I wrote the book as a narrative poem in a free-verse style. I like this style because it allowed me to use a ton of imagery to tell my story by showing it. The poetic structure also enabled me to say what needed to be said in 100 pages—instead of probably 300 pages if I had written it in prose. A show called This Is Baltimore, Too produced a documentary about my book, which aired on a local cable television channel. Here’s a link to the show if any of your readers would like to take a look at it. This Is Baltimore, Too — Seeing Through Blindness with Matt Harris
  5. Where can people buy your books?

My book is available on Amazon—in both paperback and Kindle versions.

Matt
Photo of Matt Harris.

Let’s get to know more about you and your disability…

  1. Name a bad habit that you have? I have a tendency to rock back and forth sometimes when I’m standing up. I developed this habit when my oldest daughter was a baby. Sometimes the only way for her to fall asleep was for me to stand up and rock back and forth with her in my arms.
  2. Name your best quality? I’m a good listener.
  3. If you could interview anyone living or dead who would it be and why? I would love to interview John Milton, the British poet who wrote the epic poem Paradise Lost. Milton was blind when he wrote this masterpiece in the 1600s. I would ask him how he, as a blind person, wrote and edited this voluminous piece using only seventeenth-century technology.
  4. Where do you see yourself in five years? I would hope to have published my next memoir and several more books of poetry by then. I would also hope to be traveling the country to recite my poetry at various venues.
  5. What is the name/cause of your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have)? As I mentioned earlier, I have a genetic disease called Usher Syndrome (US), which causes both blindness and deafness. At age 21, I was first diagnosed with a genetic eye disease called Retinitis Pigmentosa (RP). RP causes severe visual impairment and can lead to total blindness. At the time of my RP diagnosis, I was declared legally blind and could still hear perfectly. By age 45, I started to experience hearing loss. About 10 years later, after my hearing further deteriorated, and since RP and US are genetically related, I was tested for US, and the results came back positive.
  6. How does your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have) effect you on a daily basis? Having a dual sensory loss can be challenging. It often feels like I’m in a foreign country trying to decipher language and the lay of the land. It sometimes feels as if I’m fading away. But, fortunately, the technologies available today help me maneuver through some of the foreign territory that I face each day. Also, as I mentioned earlier, my faith in Jesus helps to anchor me in peace while I’m trying to figure out how to navigate this new world in which I find myself.
  7. What do other people feel about your visual impairment (or other disability that you may have)? I feel that my condition is very misunderstood and that people have a lot of misconceptions about it. For example, there is a misconception that blind people have bionic hearing. This myth trips me up at times when people think that about me, not realizing that I actually have a profound hearing loss. This misconception can create misunderstandings when people speak to me and then misinterpret my lack of response as rudeness. I try to dispel these misconceptions whenever I can. On the other hand, some people, even though they still might think that we have superior hearing, still insist on speaking loudly to us. Although this irritates many blind people, it actually helps me with my hearing loss. All in all, however, I do believe that for the most part people in general mean well. I think that the people I meet in my everyday travels just simply do not know how to respond to me because they haven’t been around people in my situation. These are just a few of the many obstacles I face each day. I’ll save the rest for my future memoir.
  8. If you had to give one piece of advice to others about having a visual impairment (or other disability that you may have) what would it be? I would say to try and develop a good sense of humor about visual impairment and smile a lot and try to put people at ease. Also, if you are losing your sight gradually, I think it’s very important to be aware of–and grieve–the emotional and psychological trauma that can occur in each stage of sight loss. These continual losses over a course of a lifetime can be harmful if not dealt with properly.
  9. Where can other people find you on Social media (Please list and provide links)

I mostly hang out on Facebook. Here’s a link to my Home Page: Matt’s Facebook page

Let’s talk about the holidays…

  1. What holidays do you celebrate during the winter season?

I celebrate Christmas and New Year’s.

  1. What is one of your favorite memories of the holiday? I liked when my daughters opened their presents on Christmas Day when they were little. They would get so excited. I also enjoyed the warmth and the scent of seasoned oak logs that crackled in our wood stove that we always burned on Christmas Day. These were very fond memories.
  2. Best gift you ever received?

The Gift of Eternal life through Jesus Christ my Lord!

  1. What does the holidays mean to you?

In recent years, the holidays have become a time of reflection for me. But, of course, they also represent a time of giving. And with that thought in mind, I would like to conclude by giving a free copy of my book, Seeing Through Blindness, to the first five readers who comment on your blog using a quotation from your article. (Unfortunately, I can only send copies in the United States.) Just PM the location to Amanda to where you would like me to send the book.* Thanks again, Amanda, for inviting me to your blog. Happy Holidays!

_____________________________________________

*Amanda’s email is: Amanda@amandagene.com

If you would like to be interviewed on my blog please email me at: Amanda@amandagene.com

2019: October is Dyslexia Awareness Month

Dyslexia was a word that I didn’t understand much as a child. As a second-grade student I went once a day to sound out letters, write letters and to practice reading. I didn’t understand why I was sent to this classroom. All I knew was that I thought the class was boring. Day after day I would go through the flash cards with sounds A Apple, P Preacher. Finally, one day, I asked my mom why I was in the class. She explained to me that I had a condition that effected my learning. The condition was called Dyslexia.

According to the International Dyslexia Association, Dyslexia is a brain disorder that effects two main abilities, and that is to read and spell.

 

 

There are many myths that people generally hear about Dyslexia. I have decided to discuss three of them.

  1. People with Dyslexia can not read. This myth is false. I struggled to read, however with proper support and training I can read very well.
  2. People with Dyslexia see the words backwards. This is false as well. I may get my letters and sometimes numbers backwards, but I don’t see the words backwards.
  3. People with Dyslexia can not be successful. This is completely false. Many famous people have Dyslexia and are successful. I see myself as a successful person. With technology and hard work Dyslexia doesn’t have to control me. I can overcome it.

What are some myths that you have heard about Dyslexia? Let me know down in the comments below.